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.........................................WELCOME......................................... The Central Malaita Students Association (CMSA) is a multi-dialect and cultural Student Group Consisting of students from Kwara’ae, Langalanga, Kwai and Ngongosila, Malaita Outer Islands, Kwaio and Fataleka. Our vision and objective is to protect the norms and cultural values of our members while at the same time we enhance our academic knowledge and skills towards the promotion of development and the improvement of living standards in our respective regions. .............................................DISCLAIMER............................... The site welcomes any contribution by way of information, comments, news articles, photos etc from its members and interested members of the public to ensure we are well informed of all the developments in our villages, constituencies, regions, islands, country, region and the world at large as well. However, any transmission of information, news and comments is intended only for the use of the members of the Association. Any use or dissemination of information provided in this site in other websites or medium of information is not the responsibility of the Association, and the Association cannot be held liable for it. The contents of this webpage, unless expressly stated, do not comprise the views of the Association or any representation by the Association, but are views of its individual members. .
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  • Central Malaita Student Association(CMSA) would include Malaita Outter Islands student as of next year.That means if you are from Malaita Outter Islands, you are part of CMSA.
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Central Malaita Dancing Group at the Tsunami Appeal at Laucala Campus administrator

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REACHING OUT....A young boy from Kilusakwalo reading through a pamphlet about RAMSI’s work in Solomon Islands which was distributed during a meeting by a RAMSI Outreach Team to the village yesterday. PICTURE: MOFFAT MAMU administrator

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A Malaita Ramo - JanesOceania.com

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A house found it self submerged as a result of the Tsunami - Lifhaus.com">

Jacinta Moli from Central Malaita representing Solomon Islands in Powerlifting during the Commonwealth Games administrator

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Tennis Queen Irine George from Central Malaita" ">
Thursday, August 03, 2006
RAMSI reaches out in Malaita
RAMSI reaches out in Malaita

By MOFFAT MAMU

A FIRST EVER outreach program organised by the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (RAMSI) was successful completed yesterday in Malaita.
A high level team of eight personals from RAMSI completed the two days outreach program to the communities of Dukwasi, Ambu, Kilusakwalo and Fiu.
Such an outreach program had been conducted in a number of communities around Honiara but to come out from Honiara in such a high level delegation and visit four communities within two days is the first of its kind said Chris Tarohimae of the Office of the Special Coordinator.
The delegation visited Dukwasi and Ambu communities near Auki on Monday and yesterday morning visited Kilusakwalo and Fiu.
During the visits the communities were briefed about the work and role of RAMSI to the communities for about two hours.
Chris told Solomon Star that since a lot had been said about RAMSI the grassroot people and those living in the provinces should know the various components of RAMSI serving in the country.
“This outreach program is part of educating the people about the work of RAMSI in the country,” he said.
In each of the communities the Police Participating Force (PPF), Office of the Special Coordinator, RAMSI Advisors of the Finance Ministry, and Coalition Task Force (CTF) and Machinery of the government representatives were given the opportunity to brief the communities about the role of the RAMSI’s component.
It was an interesting discussion the communities held with RAMSI as questions and answers were exchanged during the four sessions of the meetings with the communities.
Representing the Special Coordinator’s Office Jane Kriegel thanked the communities for their turnout in all the discussions.
She said the it is good to reach out to the grassroots and tell them the functions of RAMSI and what it is doing and who made up RAMSI.
Each of the communities have expressed gratitude over the delegation’s visit because it was the first time for such a high level delegation to visit them to give them first hand information about RAMSI’s work.
According to Tarohimae similar outreach will be conducted next month to the Western Province for several days comprising of some RAMSI personals who are working in various components of RAMSI.
By next year most of the provinces in the country will be covered through such an outreach program, he said
The delegation includes Sue Ingram Coordinator of the Machinery of Governance, Jane Ingram Office of the Special Coordinator, Andrew Beaumont and Bruce Arnold of Ministry of Finance, Gino Gaspari and Sepola Niulakita of the Participating Police Force (PPF), Capt Setareki Bogidrau and LCPL Karl Arand of the Coalition Task Force.
posted by administrator @ 10:44 AM   14 comments
Thousands of SI artifacts stored in British museums
Submitted by Arthur Wate
SOLOMON Islands is said to have some 11,800 cultural items stored in museums around England.
These include artifacts that resemble collections that could have originated from parts of our islands.
Unfortunately, proved dates and information to validate the items were not available to many of these items.
This was discovered by a group of local researchers led by Director of National Museum Lawrence Foana’ato, who recently attended the Melanesian Art Project Conference held in England at the British Museum.
A senior research writer Michael Kwaioloa, who was part of the group, said during their participation in the three weeks conference they visited five museums - British Museum, Orsman, Kew Gardens, Oxford, Pitt River, Cambridge and Maidston Museum.
“From the visit we had noted that local artifacts found are only labeled with unproved dates and that the artifacts were labeled with no enough information to validate the historic items collected,” Mr Kwaioloa said.
Fortunately, Mr Kwaioloa said they were able to provide the needed information in the five museums visited to enable the English population to know more about the historical background of the collected items.
This was made possible by the conference which was organised to explore the relationships between a wide range of indigenous art and artifact forms - an initiative of Goldsmith College, University of London and the British Museum, funded by Arts and Humanities Research Council.
Mr Kwaioloa said the unstudied Melanesian collections in Britain and other museums in and outside London City was what intrigue the set up of the conference.
“This conference is a project that is aimed to bring more perspectives to both the study of indigenous art and artifacts as was foretold by our historic ancestors but were seen in other museums around the world,” said Mr Kwaioloa, who is also the Honorary Secretary to the Solomon Island traditional Culture and Environment Conservation Foundation.
He believe that the rareness of not easily identifying and noting the artifacts of Melanesians was because of the following:
l That the early arrival of the church and its pioneers had put illusions in the minds of our ancestors that the artifacts were ghosts. Thus the artifacts were burnt and destroyed.
l That some of the rare artifacts were sold for cash since the sellers had recognised that they are worthy and demanded by the outside world.
l That the level of thinking by our people in those days was only based on the idea that the items are less important and only relevant for usage during their time.
However, Mr Kwaioloa said with the project, it would enable people under the ownership heritage promote mutual relationship between museums and the Melanesian communities which includes Solomon Islands.
Mr Kwaioloa added that the project will assess approaches to Art in Anthropology, aiming to move beyond the current stand-point between meaning-oriented perspectives, and those building on gels theory of art as agency, while acknowledging the continuing usefulness of both these paradigms (model).
“It will explore the scope for considering art objects and visualizations of social relations and processes and as enactment (degree, make into a law) of personal, social, or historical narratives or written account.”
Mr Kwaioloa is continuing extensive consultation with traditional owners, that the project will also document and interpret the range and variety of quantity that are not being of the same period and age investment in historic collections.
posted by administrator @ 10:35 AM   8 comments
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